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The Lounge Wardrobe: The Tank and Pants

After I got done sewing my nightgown, I was so jazzed about the pattern that I decided I needed to crank out some more garments from it.  So, I decided to give the tank (view C) and pants (view D) a shot.

Simplicity 1720

When I first got done with the nightgown, I felt like it, as a size medium, was a bit big (that has been since taken care of by improper pre-washing and pre-shrinkage of my fabric) so I decided to give the size small a shot for both of these lounge pieces.

I used a really soft and super fabulous modal knit from Fabric Mart for this set.  It was a whopping 78″ wide, so I was able to easily cut both of these pieces out of the 1 1/2 yards I purchased.  It was pretty fantastic!

The pants are a true size small, and I’m glad I cut them as such – they fit great!  They’re a little long, but I left them like that on purpose; I’d rather they be a bit too long than too short. I don’t much care for ankle drafts.  The pattern called for cutting a strip of fabric and just sewing it on top of the turned over casing to create an inner casing for the elastic and an outer casing for a drawstring. Pretty smart, but I’m not sure I like the look, and decided after the pants were complete that I really only need elastic, and thus didn’t need to sew on that strip. To each their own!

Simplicity 1720They’re a bit high waisted, or droopy crotched, whichever you’d like to choose.  But, overall, they are COMFY!

The collar of the top is a small, but the body of it is basically in between a small and a medium:  I cut a small but used only a 1/4″ seam allowance on my serger, which gave me an extra 1 1/2″ of ease than a true small with 5/8″ seam allowances would have.

Simplicity 1720

Sewing the sleeve edges of the collar was a bit futzy, but it worked out pretty well.  I also decided to follow the directions as written and apply the interfacing to the collar piece instead of the facing (the opposite I did last time around).  Worked out fine.

Now that I’ve made both a medium and a small/medium in this top, I think I will stick with a small in the collar and a medium in the body going forward.

Simplicity 1720

I loved how the first piece, my nightgown, turned out so much that I decided I needed to make my mom a nightgown for her birthday. I meant to make her one with short sleeves, like my nightgown, but I accidentally got most of it cut out before I realized I didn’t have enough fabric. D’oh! So, I went sleeveless:

Simplicity 1720 view B/C

When I was going through the directions, I noticed that it called for using bias tape to finish the armholes. That just seemed wrong…to put random woven fabric on soft, knit sleepwear. So, instead of using packaged bias tape, I cut some self fabric bias and applied it as such:

DSCF4980Sewed onto the armhole, right sides together

DSCF4983Trimmed ‘er down.

DSCF4987Pressed flat.

DSCF4989Folded tape to meet seam allowance, then folded again to create a double fold flush with the seam.

DSCF5005Top stitched!

Alternately, you could cut a wider strip, fold it in half, sew it on, trim and then fold the whole thing under and top stitch. I did it the way I did because I thought it would be easier to get around the curves.

I’m pretty pleased with how it turned out. The self-fabric bias moves with the garment, and is just as soft as it!  After this worked so well, I applied the same treatment to my modal tank top.

Viva La PJs!

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About sometimessewist

Howdy! I’m Jess, a 30-something midwesterner who loves ice cream, Martinis, and makin’ things. When I’m not sewing, knitting, or learning some new craft, I’m reading, spending time with my guy, or plotting my next project.

3 responses »

  1. Your lounge collection is fab! I really like this pattern, thanks for pointing it out – I never look in the sleepwear section. It would make a great daywear tank top too, it’s going on my list!

    Reply
  2. Pingback: The Lounge Wardrobe: The Robe | the Sometimes Sewist

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